Space NASA 21st Century Missions



NASA astronaut Jessica Meir trims leaves and harvests a crop of Mizuna mustard greens grown inside the International Space Station. (Photo/Agencies)



NASA astronaut Christina Koch collects and packs Mizuna mustard greens grown and harvested inside the International Space Station on November 13th. (Photo/Agencies)



NASA astronauts (from left) Jessica Meir and Christina Koch harvest a crop of Mizuna mustard greens grown inside the International Space Statio'sn Veggie botany facility located in the Columbus laboratory module. (Photo/Agencies)



Mizuna mustard greens are growing aboard the International Space Station to demonstrate the feasibility of space agriculture to provide fresh food for crews on deep space missions. (Photo/Agencies)
 
CAPE CANAVERAL, FL, UNITED STATES
10.27.2019. Courtesy Photos by the 45th Space Wing Public Affairs.

The X-37B landed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Oct. 27, 2019.








WASHINGTON (AFNS) --
The Air Force’s X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle Mission 5 successfully landed at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center Shuttle Landing Facility Oct. 27, 2019, at 3:51 a.m.

The spaceplane conducted on-orbit experiments for 780 days during its mission, recently breaking its own record by being in orbit for more than two years. As of today, the total number of days spent on-orbit for the entire test vehicle program is 2,865 days.

“The X-37B continues to demonstrate the importance of a reusable spaceplane,” said Secretary of the Air Force Barbara Barrett. “Each successive mission advances our nation’s space capabilities.”
 
The robotic arm on NASA's InSight Mars lander is pinning a heat flow probe, or mole, to one side of a hole it's created in the surface, increasing friction enough for the mole to burrow deeper. (Photos/NASA)





 
SpaceX uses NASA facilities...so....

Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket

A Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket on a resupply mission to the International Space Station lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. (Photo/Agencies)

SpaceX launched a 6000-pound shipment to the International Space Station on Thursday, including “mighty mice” for a muscle study, a robot sensitive to astronauts’ emotions and a miniature version of a brewery’s malt house.








 


In this Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019 file photo, a Boeing Starliner spacecraft sits on a United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket at Launch Complex 41 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Cape Canaveral, Fla. After an intensive review, on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019, NASA and Boeing managers agreed to a Dec. 20 liftoff. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Boeing's Starliner crew capsule finally has a launch date for its first test flight to the International Space Station.

After an intensive review Thursday, NASA and Boeing managers agreed to a Dec. 20 liftoff.

Just a few technical issues remain to be completed, he noted.

No one will be aboard, just a mannequin named Rosie. Three astronauts will strap in for the second test flight of a Starliner sometime next year.

SpaceX also plans to launch astronauts for NASA next year. The company conducted a test flight without a crew back in March.

NASA turned to the two private companies in 2014 to ferry astronauts to and from the space station.

Whether Boeing or SpaceX, it will be the first time U.S. astronauts rocket to orbit from home soil in nearly nine years. The longer-than-anticipated hiatus stretches back to NASA's last space shuttle flight in July 2011. NASA astronauts have been stuck riding Russian rockets in the interim.

United Launch Alliance's Atlas V rocket will provide the Starliner's lift from Cape Canaveral, a little before sunrise. The capsule will parachute into New Mexico on Dec. 28 to close out the flight.

 


An Atlas V CST-100 OFT Starliner rocket launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., on Dec. 20, 2019. This was the Starliner's, a capsule manufactured by Boeing, first test flight and it's mission was to deliver supplies to the astronauts at the International Space Station. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Zoe Thacker)
 
US Army COL Andrew Morgan spacewalks





Back dropped by the rotating earth, U.S. Army and NASA Astronaut Col. Andrew Morgan pauses for a photo opportunity during extravehicular activity (EVA) #64 at the International Space Station’s Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer worksite Jan. 25, 2020. Col. Morgan and Italian Air Force and ESA astronaut Col. Luca Parmitano participated in this fourth and final EVA to complete repairs on the AMS, a state-of-the-art particle physics detector. The emblems displayed on Col. Morgan's cuff checklist are U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command (top) and U.S. Space Command (bottom). (Photos by ESA Astronaut Luca Parmitano)



NASA astronaut U.S. Army Col. Andrew Morgan participates in extravehicular activity (EVA) #57 with NASA Astronaut Christina Koch, Oct. 11, 2019, to upgrade the International Space Station’s solar array batteries. Morgan, with one of the station’s four solar arrays in the background, is on the most extreme port side of the ISS during this EVA. Morgan is the commander of the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command’s Army Astronaut Detachment at Johnson Space Center, Texas. (Photo by NASA astronaut Christina Koch)



NASA astronaut U.S. Army Col. Andrew Morgan holds a new cooling module for the International Space Station’s Alpha Magnet Spectrometer (AMS) during extravehicular activity (EVA) #61, Dec. 2, 2019. Morgan worked with Italian Air Force and European Space Agency astronaut Italian Air Force Col. Luca Parmitano on this third of a series of four EVAs to repair the failing AMS, a state-of-the-art particle physics detector. (Photo by ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano)
 
To view this content we will need your consent to set third party cookies.
For more detailed information, see our cookies page.

To view this content we will need your consent to set third party cookies.
For more detailed information, see our cookies page.
 


An Atlas V AEHF-6 rocket successfully launches from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., March 26, 2020. The launch of the AEHF-6, a sophisticated communications relay satellite, is the first Department of Defense payload launched for the United States Space Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Joshua Conti)

 


NASA astronauts Douglas Hurley, left, and Robert Behnken, wearing SpaceX spacesuits, are seen as they depart the Neil A. Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building for Launch Complex 39A during a dress rehearsal prior to the Demo-2 mission launch, Saturday, May 23, 2020, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. (Photo/Agencies)



NASA astronauts Robert Behnken, left, and Douglas Hurley, right, are seen on a monitor showing the crew access arm at Launch Complex 39A during a dress rehearsal in preparation for the launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the company's Crew Dragon spacecraft on NASA's SpaceX Demo-2 mission, Saturday, May 23, 2020, in firing room four of the Launch Control Center at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. (Photo/Agencies)



NASA astronaut Douglas Hurley rehearses putting on his SpaceX spacesuit in the Astronaut Crew Quarters inside the Neil A. Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building at the Kennedy Space Center ahead of NASA’s SpaceX Demo-2 mission to the International Space Station in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S. May 23, 2020. (Photo/Agencies)



NASA astronauts Douglas Hurley (L) and Robert Behnken pose while participating in a dress rehearsal for launch at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center ahead of NASA’s SpaceX Demo-2 mission to the International Space Station in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S. May 23, 2020. (Photo/Agencies)
 
^Great pics, bdpopeye! Weather permitting, not long now.



About the SpaceX Spacesuits they are wearing:

The suit designer is legendary Hollywood costume designer Jose Fernandez, who is known for costumes in blockbusters such as "Wonder Woman," "Wolverine," "Batman vs. Superman" and "Captain America: Civil War."
Link: https://www.space.com/spacex-crew-dragon-spacesuits-explained.html


The spacesuit is custom-made for each passenger aboard Crew Dragon and is designed to be functional, lightweight, and to offer protection from potential depressurization. A single connection point on the suit’s thigh attaches life support systems, including air and power connections. The helmet is custom manufactured using 3D printing technology and includes integrated valves, mechanisms for visor retraction and locking, and microphones within the helmet’s structure. The custom-tailored suits include touchscreen compatible gloves, a flame-resistant outer layer and provides pressurization with a controlled environment for the crew in atypical situations, such as cabin depressurization. The suit also routes communications and cooling systems to the astronauts during flight.
Link: https://blogs.nasa.gov/commercialcr...pacesuits-ready-for-mission-to-space-station/


A Tour of SpaceX's Spacesuit
To view this content we will need your consent to set third party cookies.
For more detailed information, see our cookies page.
 
Last edited:
^Great pics, bdpopeye! Weather permitting, not long now.



About the SpaceX Spacesuits they are wearing:


Link: https://www.space.com/spacex-crew-dragon-spacesuits-explained.html)



Link: https://blogs.nasa.gov/commercialcr...pacesuits-ready-for-mission-to-space-station/


A Tour of SpaceX's Spacesuit
To view this content we will need your consent to set third party cookies.
For more detailed information, see our cookies page.
Only in the USA..."Lets get a Hollywood designer for our spacesuits" rocket-::D
 
It´s amazing how the miniaturization of electronics has increased room space. These guys are going up with more space than anyone ever had i think, even in the space shuttle I´m not sure there was that much free space.

Really excited. A new ship, and the return of America to space.
 
Got some pics on my phone, (apologies quality of pics is not the best from my phone), but they are from a NASA – A Human Adventure exhibition shown over here in Australia, which included a full scale replica of the front section of a space shuttle, just to give an idea of the amount of room in them.

Space Shuttle front section replica
57581564_10219297100518691_2912262442601938944_o.jpg


This pic shows an additional three seats downstairs under the front section of the Shuttle pic above.
57451141_10219297100918701_2538535176145731584_o.jpg




Pics of Inside a few of the other replicas in the exhibition


Apollo Space Module
58377388_10219296877993128_7400481633171668992_o.jpg


Apollo Lunar module
58883044_10219296902833749_5852458094071644160_o.jpg


Gemini
57577021_10219296914714046_8429095935144886272_o.jpg



Mercury
57788208_10219296963555267_2199915251539902464_o.jpg
 

Attachments

  • 57581564_10219297100518691_2912262442601938944_o.jpg
    57581564_10219297100518691_2912262442601938944_o.jpg
    86.8 KB · Views: 72
Back
Top