Photos Counter Terror and Special Mission / Operations Units

United Kingdom Ranger Regiment during joint training with Swedish Jaeger Battalion troops in Swedish Lapland, October 2022.
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Sgt John Hollingsworth of D Squadron, 22 SAS
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A former member of the elite Parachute Regiment, John Hollingsworth decided to attempt selection and eventually passed the gruelling 6 month process where he was assigned to D Squadron, 22nd SAS Regiment. He was awarded the QGM for actions in Northern Ireland.

He deployed with D Squadron in 2006 and was assigned to the 'Hathor' detachment, an experienced Cadre of SAS Operators tasked to eliminate the iraqi insurgency in Basra, Iraq.

Just weeks before his death in early November, he was shot through the back of the neck whilst leading a raid on an insurgent occupied building in Basra. The bullet missed his carotid artery by millimetres and he was sent to the UK for treatment but decided to return to action within a few days rather than taking a lengthy period of time to recover and rejoined his squadron shortly after. He was awarded the CGC for his actions here after singlehandedly killing 6 insurgents during a nighttime raid.

On the night of 23/24 November 2006, 'Hathor' was tasked to strike a block of enemy buildings in Basra. Hollingsworth was leading multiple assault teams and was in command of the operation, early on in the ensuing firefight he was hit with a single bullet to the chest but continued to fight although mortally wounded, soon losing consciousness. He was taken to a nearby military hospital but passed away soon after.

He was repatriated in a discreet funeral in Credenhill, his units home, and laid to rest
 
KGB special forces troops on patrol in Baku, Azerbaijan SSR on January 30th, 1990.
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Sgt John Hollingsworth of D Squadron, 22 SAS
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A former member of the elite Parachute Regiment, John Hollingsworth decided to attempt selection and eventually passed the gruelling 6 month process where he was assigned to D Squadron, 22nd SAS Regiment. He was awarded the QGM for actions in Northern Ireland.

He deployed with D Squadron in 2006 and was assigned to the 'Hathor' detachment, an experienced Cadre of SAS Operators tasked to eliminate the iraqi insurgency in Basra, Iraq.

Just weeks before his death in early November, he was shot through the back of the neck whilst leading a raid on an insurgent occupied building in Basra. The bullet missed his carotid artery by millimetres and he was sent to the UK for treatment but decided to return to action within a few days rather than taking a lengthy period of time to recover and rejoined his squadron shortly after. He was awarded the CGC for his actions here after singlehandedly killing 6 insurgents during a nighttime raid.

On the night of 23/24 November 2006, 'Hathor' was tasked to strike a block of enemy buildings in Basra. Hollingsworth was leading multiple assault teams and was in command of the operation, early on in the ensuing firefight he was hit with a single bullet to the chest but continued to fight although mortally wounded, soon losing consciousness. He was taken to a nearby military hospital but passed away soon after.

He was repatriated in a discreet funeral in Credenhill, his units home, and laid to rest

Rest In Eternal Peace.
 

Kadena hosts joint active shooter exercise​


U.S. Army Green Berets assigned to 1st Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne), coordinate clearing a facility during a joint operation active shooter exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, July 20, 2023. The exercise was conducted by the 18th Wing SFS, Green Berets, and U.S. Navy Seals to increase efficiency with their communication skills, weapons handling, performance under pressure and room-clearing procedures. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathan R. Sifuentes) (Photo has been edited for security purposes.)


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Kadena hosts joint active shooter exercise​


U.S. Army Green Berets assigned to 1st Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne), coordinate clearing a facility during a joint operation active shooter exercise at Kadena Air Base, Japan, July 20, 2023. The exercise was conducted by the 18th Wing SFS, Green Berets, and U.S. Navy Seals to increase efficiency with their communication skills, weapons handling, performance under pressure and room-clearing procedures. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathan R. Sifuentes) (Photo has been edited for security purposes.)

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Talisman Sabre 23 | NSW and Australian Army SOF conduct CQC training​


Operators from a U.S. Naval Special Warfare unit and the Australian Army 2nd Commando Regiment clear a hallway while rehearsing close quarter combat scenarios at Holsworthy Barracks in New South Wales, Australia during Talisman Sabre 23, July 20, 2023. Naval Special Warfare is the nation’s elite maritime special operations force, uniquely positioned to extend the Fleet’s reach and gain and maintain access for the Joint Force in competition and conflict. Talisman Sabre is the largest bilateral military exercise between Australia and the United States advancing a free and open Indo-Pacific by strengthening relationships and interoperability among key allies and enhancing our collective capabilities to respond to a wide variety of potential security concerns. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Gaither)

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NSW, Australian Army conduct live fire training​


Operators from a U.S. Naval Special Warfare unit and the Australian Army 2nd Commando Regiment conduct shooting and movement drills during a bilateral training exercise in Sydney, July 27, 2023. Naval Special Warfare is the nation's elite maritime special operations force, uniquely positioned to extend the Fleet's reach and gain and maintain access for the Joint Force in competition and conflict. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Gaither)

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Operators from a U.S. Naval Special Warfare unit and the Australian Army 2nd Commando Regiment conduct live fire weapons training during a bilateral training exercise in Sydney, July 27, 2023. Naval Special Warfare is the nation's elite maritime special operations force, uniquely positioned to extend the Fleet's reach and gain and maintain access for the Joint Force in competition and conflict. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Gaither)
 
Green Berets assigned to 1st SFG during a Joint Counter-Terrorism Exercise held at the Philippine Army training base on the southern island of Mindanao. 2004
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Italian and US Rangers during training, 2016
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22 SAS Operator Greg Symonds, Tragically killed in a hit and run collision whilst on R&R in California, USA. 21 March 2017. He had just returned from a long deployment to Syria.
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A hit-and-run driver who killed an SAS soldier while he was on operational duties in the United States was never caught, an inquest has heard.
Greg Symonds, 31, a father-of-two from Newport, was left for dead after being hit by a car in Santa Monica in Los Angeles, California, on 5 March.
An inquest in Hereford heard the paratrooper had been out socialising and had high blood-alcohol levels.
He suffered a fractured skull and died in hospital four days later.
The inquest was told debris from the silver Toyota that hit Mr Symonds was found at the scene and there was CCTV footage of the car but police failed to trace the driver and the investigation was suspended.
Scott Pace, of the Santa Monica Police department, said: "Based on information received, Mr Symons was in violation of the regulation that every pedestrian on a road other than at a crossing should yield right of way to all vehicles."
"The driver should have known that he was in a collision and was required to stop but I don't believe the driver was at fault."
Deputy Herefordshire Coroner Roland Wooderson recorded a narrative conclusion and said Mr Symonds died as a result of a road traffic collision.
 
US Navy Special Warfare Combatant Crewman (SWCC) from Special Boat Team 12 (SBT-12) carry out an equipment check before starting a training mission at Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station.
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22 SAS Operator Greg Symonds, Tragically killed in a hit and run collision whilst on R&R in California, USA. 21 March 2017. He had just returned from a long deployment to Syria.
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A hit-and-run driver who killed an SAS soldier while he was on operational duties in the United States was never caught, an inquest has heard.
Greg Symonds, 31, a father-of-two from Newport, was left for dead after being hit by a car in Santa Monica in Los Angeles, California, on 5 March.
An inquest in Hereford heard the paratrooper had been out socialising and had high blood-alcohol levels.
He suffered a fractured skull and died in hospital four days later.
The inquest was told debris from the silver Toyota that hit Mr Symonds was found at the scene and there was CCTV footage of the car but police failed to trace the driver and the investigation was suspended.
Scott Pace, of the Santa Monica Police department, said: "Based on information received, Mr Symons was in violation of the regulation that every pedestrian on a road other than at a crossing should yield right of way to all vehicles."
"The driver should have known that he was in a collision and was required to stop but I don't believe the driver was at fault."
Deputy Herefordshire Coroner Roland Wooderson recorded a narrative conclusion and said Mr Symonds died as a result of a road traffic collision.

Rest In Peace Eternally.
 

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