Photos Colour and Colourised Photos of WW2 & earlier conflicts

Despite her injuries, she is proud and smiling. Julita Cyrus Sobolewska ps. "Lidka", a 21-year-old liaison officer during the Warsaw Uprising.
The photo was taken shortly after a shell hit the tenement house at ul. Świętokrzyska.
Julita survived the war and died in 1993.
Ev3OPOAXEAAlHUd
 
Polish Women from the Second World War.

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Not all of them managed to survive the war, but in the face of the extermination of the Polish nation, they managed to act as they should!
They were nurses and liaison officers, but also snipers and miners. During the Warsaw Uprising, they fought, made friends forever, fell in love, got married.
 
Somme, France. March 1917. A German Army dressing station established just behind the front line in a sector between St Quentin and Laon.
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(Photo source - German War Museum; Bufa 2274)
Colour by Frédéric Duriez
 
Pvt. John C Rodrigues, Pawtuckett, R.I., gives two weary paratroopers their first taste of GI food in 37 days.

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Pvt. John C Rodrigues, Pawtuckett, R.I., gives two weary paratroopers their first taste of GI food in 37 days. They were captured by the Germans the latter part of D-Day, escaped after several days imprisonment during a night march, living off raw potatoes most of the time. They contacted US forces on July 15th 1944. Left to right: Sgt. Robert D. Henderson, Seattle, WA, and Sgt. Havrill W. Lazenby, Nashville, TN. 505th Parachute Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division. July 17th, 1944.
Photograph from the Signal Corps Archive
Colors by Mohamed Bayouli
 
Polish Women from the Second World War.

View attachment 283645
Not all of them managed to survive the war, but in the face of the extermination of the Polish nation, they managed to act as they should!
They were nurses and liaison officers, but also snipers and miners. During the Warsaw Uprising, they fought, made friends forever, fell in love, got married.
Amen..............and the last of dying breed too! notworthy;
 
Air to air view of four RNZAF No. 16 Squadron P-40 Kittyhawks and a No. 9 Squadron Hudson NZ2079 in formation, on the way to Guadalcanal, 1943

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No. 16 Squadron P-40's were responsible for the destruction of 14 Japanese aircraft with the loss of 7 Kittyhawks to enemy fighters.
RNZAF official photo
Colourised by Daniel Rarity
 
F4U Corsairs NZ5326, NZ5315 and NZ5307 of the Royal New Zealand Air Force in flight with the island of Guadalcanal in the background. Likely flown by pilots of No. 26 Squadron with the photo dating from April 1945 or later.
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Source: Air Force Museum of New Zealand, file PR4972.
 
American tank operators pose by their M4 Sherman tank during maneuvers at FortKnox, 1942.jpg

American tank operators pose by their M4 Sherman tank during maneuvers at FortKnox, 1942
5th engineers at weymouth england on their way to omaha beach.jpg

5th engineers at weymouth england on their way to omaha beach

Free French tanks and half tracks of General Leclerc's 2nd Armored Division passing through the Arc du Triomphe in Paris, probably on August 26, 1944. Sign at left "De Gaulle au pouvoir" and sign at right "Vive De Gaulle.
Can't full image this last one, think it is too high of resolution, hope it shows up.
 

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Women Air Force Service Pilots : Frances Green, Margaret (Peg) Kirchner, Ann Waldner and Blanche Osborn leaving their plane, "Pistol Packin' Mama" at the four-engine school at Lockbourne AAF, Ohio, during WASP B-17 Flying Fortress ferry training.
 
Decorated Bavarian infantrymen pose with two French prisoners of war. The fellow in the centre wears the insignia of the Chasseur à pied (French light infantry) on his helmet, the other one isn't so clear (possibly an artilleryman)

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Of note is the 20-round Grabenmagazin fitted to the Gew 98 on the right. These magazines were generally issued to troops in defensive positions as they were cumbersome and generally unpopular with the men in the field. It is unusual to see one out of a trench position.
(Photo and caption source - Drakegoodman Collection)
Color by Frédéric Duriez
 
A Tommy with 2nd Battalion, the Warwickshire Regiment is perched in a tree taking aim with his rifle.

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The photograph was taken during an exercise at Rumegies, near the Belgian border, on January 22, 1940.
 
Red Army Soldiers cross a shallow river with an anti tank gun. September/October, 1944 during the East Carpathian Operation.

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The Battle of the Dukla Pass, also known as the Dukla / Carpatho-Dukla / Rzeszów-Dukla / Dukla-Prešov Offensive was the battle for control over the Dukla Pass on the border between Poland and Slovakia on the Eastern Front of World War II between Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union in September–October 1944. It was part of the Soviet East Carpathian Strategic Offensive that also included the Carpathian-Uzhgorod Offensive. The operation's primary goal, to provide support for the Slovak rebellion, was not achieved, but it concluded the full liberation of the Ukrainian SSR.
The German resistance in the eastern Carpathian region was much stronger than expected. The battle which began on 8 September would not see the Soviet forces on the other side of the pass until 6 October, and German forces would stop their heavy resistance in the region only around 10 October. Five days to Prešov turned into fifty days to Svidník alone with over 70,000 casualties on both sides. Prešov that was to be reached in six days remained beyond the Czechoslovaks' grasp for four months. The battle would be counted among the most bloody in the entire Eastern Front and the history of Slovakia;[5] one of the valleys in the pass near villages of Kapišová, Chyrowa, Iwla and Głojsce would become known as the Valley of Death.
Colour by Olga Shirnina
Photographer Arkady Samoilovich Shaikhet (1898-1959)
 

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