Farewell ceremony, third rotation National Guard platoon for Central Africa.

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Georgian soldiers wait for further directions in preparation of firing a 120mm mortar as part of Dynamic Front 19 at the 7th Army Training Command’s Grafenwoehr Training Area, Grafenwoehr, Germany, March 7, 2019. Dynamic Front 19 includes approximately 3,200 service members from 27 nations who are observing or participating from Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany; Riga, Latvia; and Torun, Poland; during March 2-9, 2019. Dynamic Front is an annual U.S. Army Europe exercise focused on the readiness and interoperability on U.S. Army, joint service, and allied and partner nations’ artillery and fire support working together in a multinational environment. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc.Denice Lopez)

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A Georgian soldier kneels in front of 120mm mortar rounds as part of Dynamic Front 19 at the 7th Army Training Command’s Grafenwoehr Training Area, Grafenwoehr, Germany, March 7, 2019. Dynamic Front 19 includes approximately 3,200 service members from 27 nations who are observing or participating from Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany; Riga, Latvia; and Torun, Poland; during March 2-9, 2019. Dynamic Front is an annual U.S. Army Europe exercise focused on the readiness and interoperability on U.S. Army, joint service, and allied and partner nations’ artillery and fire support working together in a multinational environment. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Denice Lopez)

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Georgian soldiers exchange a 120mm mortar during a live-fire exercise as part of Dynamic Front 19 at the 7th Army Training Command’s Grafenwoehr Training Area, Grafenwoehr, Germany, March 7, 2019. Dynamic Front 19 includes approximately 3,200 service members from 27 nations who are observing or participating from Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany; Riga, Latvia; and Torun, Poland; during March 2-9, 2019. Dynamic Front is an annual U.S. Army Europe exercise focused on the readiness and interoperability on U.S. Army, joint service, and allied and partner nations’ artillery and fire support working together in a multinational environment. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Denice Lopez)

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Georgian soldiers exchange a 120mm mortar round during a live fire exercise as part of Dynamic Front 19 at the 7th Army Training Command’s Grafenwoehr Training Area, Grafenwoehr, Germany, March 7, 2019. Dynamic Front 19 includes approximately 3,200 service members from 27 nations who are observing or participating from Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany; Riga, Latvia; and Torun, Poland; during March 2-9, 2019. Dynamic Front is an annual U.S. Army Europe exercise focused on the readiness and interoperability on U.S. Army, joint service, and allied and partner nations’ artillery and fire support working together in a multinational environment. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Denice Lopez)

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A Georgian soldier loads a 120mm mortar round as part of Dynamic Front 19 at the 7th Army Training Command’s Grafenwoehr Training Area, Grafenwoehr, Germany, March 7, 2019. Dynamic Front 19 includes approximately 3,200 service members from 27 nations who are observing or participating from Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany; Riga, Latvia; and Torun, Poland; during March 2-9, 2019. Dynamic Front is an annual U.S. Army Europe exercise focused on the readiness and interoperability on U.S. Army, joint service, and allied and partner nations’ artillery and fire support working together in a multinational environment. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Denice Lopez)

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A 120mm mortar fires during a live fire exercise as part of Dynamic Front 19 at the 7th Army Training Command’s Grafenwoehr Training Area, Grafenwoehr, Germany, March 7, 2019. Dynamic Front 19 includes approximately 3,200 service members from 27 nations who are observing or participating from Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany; Riga, Latvia; and Torun, Poland; during March 2-9, 2019. Dynamic Front is an annual U.S. Army Europe exercise focused on the readiness and interoperability on U.S. Army, joint service, and allied and partner nations’ artillery and fire support working together in a multinational environment. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Denice Lopez)

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A 120mm mortar fires during a live fire exercise as part of Dynamic Front 19 at the 7th Army Training Command’s Grafenwoehr Training Area, Grafenwoehr, Germany, March 7, 2019. Dynamic Front 19 includes approximately 3,200 service members from 27 nations who are observing or participating from Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany; Riga, Latvia; and Torun, Poland; during March 2-9, 2019. Dynamic Front is an annual U.S. Army Europe exercise focused on the readiness and interoperability on U.S. Army, joint service, and allied and partner nations’ artillery and fire support working together in a multinational environment. (U.S. Army photo by Pfc. Denice Lopez)
 
can you tell m if a georgia produces its own ammunition ? and if not what does georgia producing ?

thanks sorry for my direct question
 
can you tell m if a georgia produces its own ammunition ? and if not what does georgia producing ?

thanks sorry for my direct question

You don't have to be sorry about asking questions mate.

Georgia doesn't have ordnance factories but from what I've seen Georgia's arms manufacturer STC DELTA does produce ammunition but in limited quantities and only for specific weapons such as mortars and maybe some rocket propelled grenades. That is mostly due to the production of such weapons and possible only because of lower requirement for permanent supply. All small arms and most other ammunition is purchased from partner nations.

It surely has the capacity to produce small arms ammunition as demonstrated with the .338 & .375 GBM, but I guess they lack the manufacturing means for consequent and sufficient mass production and it's not on their priority list.
The only manufacturer of the country is mainly set on supplying vehicles to foreign customers and is only parenthetically supplying local forces with equipment and uniforms. IIRC said company is currently only expanding their vehicle production capacities. Especialy now partnering with Austrian company Rosenbauer, it gonna divert some of it's resources to the production of civilian vehicles.

AFAIK current main line of military products consist of: equipment for personnel ( plate carriers + ballistic plates & helmets, uniforms and gear ), hail supressors and Didgori APCs mainly for foreign customers but also domestic.

Other products are the entire range of mortars, 60mm commando mortars to 120mm mortars with their wheeled limbers, and ammunition. Those have been mainly exported to some Eastern European countries iirc. Don't know how much is purchased for local use.


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You don't have to be sorry about asking questions mate.

Georgia doesn't have ordnance factories but from what I've seen Georgia's arms manufacturer STC DELTA does produce ammunition but in limited quantities and only for specific weapons such as mortars and maybe some rocket propelled grenades. That is mostly due to the production of such weapons and possible only because of lower requirement for permanent supply. All small arms and most other ammunition is purchased from partner nations.

It surely has the capacity to produce small arms ammunition as demonstrated with the .338 & .375 GBM, but I guess they lack the manufacturing means for consequent and sufficient mass production and it's not on their priority list.
The only manufacturer of the country is mainly set on supplying vehicles to foreign customers and is only parenthetically supplying local forces with equipment and uniforms. IIRC said company is currently only expanding their vehicle production capacities. Especialy now partnering with Austrian company Rosenbauer, it gonna divert some of it's resources to the production of civilian vehicles.

AFAIK current main line of military products consist of: equipment for personnel ( plate carriers + ballistic plates & helmets, uniforms and gear ), hail supressors and Didgori APCs mainly for foreign customers but also domestic.

Other products are the entire range of mortars, 60mm commando mortars to 120mm mortars with their wheeled limbers, and ammunition. Those have been mainly exported to some Eastern European countries iirc. Don't know how much is purchased for local use.


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thanks man
 
i heard that we are going to heavly modernise su 25 to ge 31 bora furthermore it will e ready for producing by 2020 . what do you think is it true ?
 
i heard that we are going to heavly modernise su 25 to ge 31 bora furthermore it will e ready for producing by 2020 . what do you think is it true ?

Yeah, I've heard of this. Still not sure how realistic it is to just "upgrade" on that level. I'm no expert, but I figure new engine means different aerodynamics and specs, so a host of changes, not just engine. Overall I think it's doable but I kind of doubt it's gonna happen so soon.

But then again, they know more than we do, so. ...
 
There's no trigger mechanisms in those M4/M203 rifles in the first pic, what's up with that?? o_O
 

AFAIK, Alexandre Grigolashvili, after retirement / discharge from the GAF as a result of injuries received during the 2008 war, served as reconaissance specialist in Ukrane and was killed in action in the town of Shchastya in the Luhansk region on December 21, 2014. Rest in Peace.

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