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Veterans angry at XBox game

Discussion in 'Military Gaming' started by John A Silkstone, Apr 8, 2009.


  1. John A Silkstone United Kingdom

    John A Silkstone Mi General MI.Net Member

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    Xbox game based on Iraq conflict battle angers veterans

    A video game based on one of the bloodiest battles during the Iraq conflict has been branded 'crass and insensitive' by those affected by the fighting.

    Six Days In Fallujah, published by Japanese games giant Konami, is described as a 'survival horror' title for the Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3 consoles.

    Developed in collaboration with a handful of Iraq veteran US Marines - who have lent their videos, photos and diaries to the designers - the controversial action game is due for release next year.

    Tim Collins OBE, a former colonel of the 1st Battalion Royal Irish Regiment whose inspirational eve-of-battle speech made history in 2003, was appalled by the game's setting.

    He said: "It's much too soon to start making video games about a war that's still going on, and an extremely flippant response to one of the most important events in modern history.

    "It's particularly insensitive given what happened in Fallujah, and I will certainly oppose the release of this game."

    Reg Keys, whose son Thomas was a Red Cap killed by an Iraqi mob in June 2003, added: "Considering the enormous loss of life in the Iraq War, glorifying it in a video game demonstrates very poor judgement and bad taste.

    "It is particularly crass when you consider what actually happened in Fallujah.

    "These horrific events should be confined to the annuls of history, not trivialised and rendered for thrill-seekers to play out, over and over again, for ever more.

    "It's entirely possible that Muslim families will buy the game, and for them it may prove particularly harrowing.

    "Even worse, it could end up in the hands of a fanatical young Muslim and incite him to consider some form of retaliation or retribution. He could use it to get worked up and want to really 'finish the game'.

    "I will be calling for this game to be banned, if not worldwide then certainly in the UK."

    Six Days In Fallujah takes inspiration from the Second Battle of Fallujah - also known as Operation phantom Fury, which took place between November 7 and December 23 2004.

    An estimated 1,500 insurgents were killed - reportedly in white phosphorus attacks - along with 38 US troops during the battle.

    Six Days In Fallujah is being developed by US-based Atomic Games.

    The firm's president Peter Tamte said: "For us, the challenge was how to present the horrors of war in a game that is entertaining, but also gives people insight into a historical situation in a way that only a video game can provide.

    "Our goal is to give people that insight, of what it's like to be a Marine during that event, what it's like to be a civilian in the city, and what it's like to be an insurgent."

    John Choon, senior brand manager for Six Days In Fallujah at Konami Digital Entertainment, added: "The soldiers wanted to tell their stories through a game because that's what they grew up playing."

    In 2003, electronics giant Sony was forced to abandon plans to launch an Iraq War video game called Shock and Awe after attracting a barrage of negative publicity. It later admitted the idea had been 'an exercise of regrettable bad judgement'.
     
  2. Bombardier

    Bombardier Admin & Arbiter Staff Member Site Admin

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    I am an Xbox fanatic and would not be happy buying this title, as has been said above it is insensitive and too soon after the event.

    Bad taste all round me thinks.
     
  3. 03Fox2/1

    03Fox2/1 Corporal - USMC MI.Net Member

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    I agree with Sony, ... an exercise of "regrettable bad judgement ". I believe this endeavor by Xbox to be disdainful of the sacrifice of many brave men, many who paid with their lives and others who still suffer from grievous wounds. It is too soon to allow this reality to become nothing more than a person's entertainment. Besides, we are still in Iraq, people are still dying in Iraq and Afghanistan looks more and more foreboding. I'm sure this game is profit driven and I'm sad that a few Marines were willing to compromise their integrity for money, even if they had good intentions.
    Semper Fi
     
  4. Reloader

    Reloader Mi Lieutenant MI.Net Member

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    Tim Collins is right in what he says, "It's much too soon to start making video games about a war that's still going on, and an extremely flippant response to one of the most important events in modern history."

    Bad, very bad decision by Microsoft and Konami!
     
  5. GunBunnyInaMAB

    GunBunnyInaMAB Mi Captain MI.Net Member

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    I can't believe those numbnuts at Microsoft even considered publishing a game based on the sacrifices of American troops in a conflict that is STILL very much alive... Kind of makes you sick to think about an American company making money on the backs of American soldiers who are fighting for the Freedoms we hold so dear; those same Freedoms that allow companies like Microsoft to even exsist!!
     
  6. Holmesy7291 United Kingdom

    Holmesy7291 Mi Sergeant MI.Net Member

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    As far as I know this game was scrapped almost as soon as it was announced! Though if people are upset about video-games being made about things like that, what about movies? "The Hurt Locker" is set in Afghanistan/Iraq (can't remember which) during the current conflict/s, and I don't remember hearing people calling for it to be banned.

    Also, if you still own an original Xbox (like me), you'll probably remember a game called "Full Spectrum Warrior", and it's sequel "Full Spectrum Warrior: Ten Hammers". I can't speak for the 2nd game (as i've never played it), but the first was set in a fictional middle-eastern country that was blatantly Iraq, and had you controlling 2x4-man teams of US soldiers on various missions, mainly involving shooting as many OPFOR 'militia' as possible. That game came out around the time that GW2 started, but no-one batted an eyelid, even at the 'open mass grave' scene. People have become used to seeing scenes of war and its aftermath, and they're not shocked or numbed by it anymore. The tv coverage of the Vietnam War brought THAT conflict home to people all over the world, generating riots/protests/demonstrations etc that people from all walks of life were involved in, mostly centered around "Pull our troops out and bring 'em home!". That shocked everyone because they saw for the first time how war was actually fought, with mud, sweat, blood, screams etc. Ok the scenes we see on tv of Iraq/Afghanistan maybe aren't as graphic as the ones from Vietnam, but is that because they really don't show as much violence, or is it because we've become immune to it? Give you a personal example, a friend showed me a picture online of a dead Iraqi insurgent lying on the floor, head blown apart, blood and brains splattered everywhere...and you know what my reaction was? I laughed. I laughed my head off. I found it funny. I probably should have been shocked and horrified, but I wasn't. I just didn't care.

    I'm not saying they should have made the 'Fallujah game (personally i'd have opposed it), I just find it amusing that a lot of people complain about video-games being graphic and violent, yet they don't bat an eyelid about the likes of SAW/Hostel/Pokemon* etc.

    *If you've ever been forced to sit through a Pokemon movie, you'll understand why I put it in the same category as the others!
     
  7. Bombardier

    Bombardier Admin & Arbiter Staff Member Site Admin

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    I dont think the problem with the game is the scenes of violence and horrific images of soldiers injured or dead etc, the problem for me is that in this war many of our heroes are being brought home in coffins, my own nephew one of them.

    For me its the link with personal family loss, not that I disagree with the issues in afghanistan or believe the troops should be pulled out etc.

    Again its about bad taste, Microsoft have not paid any attention to the feelings of many families who have lost loved ones in this particular war.
     

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