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Copied from a post in United States Military Photos Thread posted by @bdpopeye







Airmen and testers from the 418th Flight Test Squadron, Army and NASA personnel, prepare a mockup of a NASA Orion spacecraft aboard a C-17 Globemaster on loan from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington, Dec. 15. The spacecraft was airdropped over the Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona as part of a test of the craft’s parachute landing system. NASA is continuing contingency tests of the Capsule Parachute Assembly System, or CPAS.
(U.S. Air Force photo by Christopher A. Okula)
 


SAN DIEGO (Jan. 25, 2018) Capt. Dennis Jacko, commanding officer of San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Anchorage (LPD 23), talks to local media during a press conference on Naval Base San Diego. Anchorage recently conducted an underway recovery test as part of a U.S. government interagency effort to safely practice and evaluate recovery processes, procedures, hardware and personnel in an open ocean environment that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft upon its return to Earth. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jesse Monford/Released)



PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 21, 2018) U.S. Navy divers from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 3 detach a harness from NASA's Orion test vehicle to the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Anchorage (LPD 23. Anchorage is underway to support NASA's Orion spacecraft Underway Recovery Test 6 (URT-6). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Natalie M. Byers/Released)



PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 21, 2018) U.S. Navy Divers assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit (EODMU) 3 in a Combat Rubber Raiding Craft (CRRC) attach a stabilization collar to NASA's Orion test article during testing with the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock USS Anchorage (LPD 23), Jan. 21. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Natalie M. Byers)





PACIFIC OCEAN (Jan. 22, 2018) NASA's Orion test article is pulled into the well deck of the San Antonio-class amphibious transport dock ship USS Anchorage (LPD 23) using NASA's line load attenuation mechanism assembly. (U.S. Navy by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Carrel Regis/Released)
 
181101-O-N0801-002 by U.S. Pacific Fleet, on Flickr

PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) U.S. Navy divers prepare to attach the "front porch" to a test version of the Orion capsule as part of Underway Recovery Test-7 (URT-7) in the open water of the Pacific Ocean. Nearby is the USS John P. Murtha. Orion will be towed into the ship's well deck. There are two large, orange mockup uprighting bags in this view, but when Orion actually splashes down there will be five. URT-7 is one in a series of tests that the Exploration Ground Systems Recovery Team, along with the U.S. Navy, are conducting to verify and validate procedures and hardware that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft after it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean following deep space exploration missions. Orion will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. (NASA photo by Tony Gray)

181101-O-N0801-001 by U.S. Pacific Fleet, on Flickr

PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) The test version of the Orion capsule is about to be released into the open water as part of Underway Recovery Test-7 aboard USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26). During recovery operations, future astronauts aboard Orion will have the choice to stay in the capsule while it is pulled into the well deck of a U.S. Navy ship, or be pulled out immediately and put on the "front porch" until taken by small boat back to the ship. URT-7 is one in a series of tests to verify and validate procedures and hardware that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft after it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean following deep space exploration missions. Orion will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. (NASA photo)
 
In case anyone did not know that Orion capsule mock-up is called a "Boiler Plate test article".

PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 1, 2018) - Sailors from Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Eleven and NASA personnel retrieve a Boilerplate Test Article (Orion capsule mock-up) November 1 during an Underway Recovery Test (URT) with amphibious transport dock USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26). URT is part of a U.S. government interagency effort to safely practice and evaluate recovery processes, procedures, hardware and personnel in an open ocean environment that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft upon its return to Earth. (U.S. Navy photo by Navy Diver Chief Petty Officer Julio Cerecer)











This looks like a US Navy MK20 liferaft to me.
 
The radiation effects of "Deep space travel" will be a big issue for Orion missions. Hopefully the effects of radiation will be slight.

After splashdown the prime recovery ship will be an amphibous ship..not an aircraft carrier as with previous Mercury, Gemini and Apollo missions.. The capsule will be floated into the well deck and secured there...and the astronauts unless injured or ill will remain in the capsule until it is secured.


HI-RES


HI-RES

PACIFIC OCEAN (Oct. 31, 2018) The Exploration Ground Systems Recovery Team, along with the U.S. Navy, practice recovering a test version of the Orion capsule and bringing it inside the well deck of the amphibious transport dock ship USS John P. Murtha (LPD 26) during Underway Recovery Test-7 (URT-7) in the Pacific Ocean, Oct. 31, 2018. URT-7 is one in a series of tests to verify and validate procedures and hardware that will be used to recover the Orion spacecraft after it splashes down in the Pacific Ocean following deep space exploration missions. Orion will have emergency abort capability, sustain the crew during space travel and provide safe re-entry from deep space return velocities. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy NASA/Released)
 
I have a question, is the capsule operative or is it still in the process of testing?
 
Excellent video explaining Orion in detail.

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So finally I found this thread not sure where to post NASA 21st century misisions or here..but if Orion has ist own thread..then here.

I found this beautiful video of the ascent abort test 2 (AA-2) on board camera

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4000k film of AA-2

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AA-2 showing the LAS components

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Attitude Control Motor Tests

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The Orion spacecraft has been exposed to temperatures ranging from –115 ° C to 75 ° C in vacuum for more than two months without interruption - the same temperatures it would experience in direct sunlight or in the shadow of the Earth or Moon during flight into space.
 
Orion being fitted to SLS - start planned for March 2022

photograph-shows-a-bullet-shaped-spacecraft-suspended-just-above-the-top-of-the-space-launch-s...jpg
 
Rollout in March. Time on the pad can be a few months if I´m correct. But it will be something to see a moon rocket come out of the VAB after fifty years...
 
Not a spaceflight per se but tomorrow, and for the first time in nearly 50 years, a moon rocket is coming out of the VAB

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6 pm florida time...on 17/3/2022

Dada!!!
 
Launch for Artemis 1 will be in June.

No idea why it should take one day longer to get to the moon than 50 years ago. I may have misunderstood.
 
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