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Other Post Not Military, But What The Hell!

Discussion in 'All Non Military Discussion' started by John A Silkstone, Nov 5, 2008.


  1. John A Silkstone United Kingdom

    John A Silkstone Mi General MI.Net Member

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    This is unbelievable and has been going on for two years, What a waste of tax payers money.

    Silky


    "Absurd" new guidelines advise pet owners against allowing dogs to beg at the table
    Failing to notice your dog is getting fat, feeding it at the table and chocolate treats are all animal cruelty that could end up putting someone in jail under new government guidelines.

    Chocolate, raisins or grapes are "poisonous" for pets, according to the code, while a dog should not be disturbed when eating as this can cause "food-related aggression".

    It also recommends that dogs should not be fed at the table as this can lead to begging - and that "curious" animals such as cats should be kept away from windows or tumble dryers.

    The new codes of practice for owners of dogs, cats and horses, just released for consultation, are part of the Animal Welfare Act 2006 to prevent cruelty. The guidance says that breaching the three codes will not in itself be a crime, but it could prove to be the deciding factor in whether an individual is found guilty in court of a pet welfare offence – which carries a maximum jail sentence of six months or a fine of up to £20,000. Opposition policiticans criticised the "over the top" rules that "take people for fools".

    However, Hilary Benn, the Environment Secretary, said the new laws afford animals "greater protection than ever before". Launching the eight-week consultation, Mr Benn said: "These three new codes of practice will outline the responsibilities of owners under the Act and give practical advice on how to fulfil them. This means no one will be able to claim ignorance as an excuse for mistreating any animal."

    The guidelines cover the environment for animals, diet, the company they enjoy, ensuring they exhibit normal behaviour patterns, as well as health and welfare issues.

    The code of practice for dogs advises against taking a dog for a walk during the hottest part of the day or feeding it less than an hour before vigorous exercise in order to avoid "bloating". Owners should groom dogs with long hair at least once a day and all dogs should have teeth cleaned with dog chews or canine toothpaste as part of routine care.

    Training dogs should be done through "positive reinforcement" rather than punishment that can lead to behavioural problems in the future. Owners can spot signs of stress such as barking excessively, urinating indoors or yawning when not tired.

    The advice stresses cats are not vegetarians and adults do not need bowls of milk. However they do need somewhere to hide and to scratch claws.

    The guidelines for horses are based on the same principles.

    Bill Wiggin, the Tory spokesman on animal welfare, said the new codes are "absurd".

    "Defra has missed the opportunity to produce a set of sensible proposals that would protect animals from abuse and mistreatment. Here we have this ridiculous guide which tells people not to walk their dog in the heat of the day or feed it at the table. DEFRA are taking people for fools."

    However, the RSPCA said the majority of cases of animal cruelty are resolved through advice and welcomed moves to educate pet owners.

    A spokesman said:”A new washing machine or pot plant comes with instructions, currently most pets do not. We think the new codes of practice will improve animal welfare and prevent animal suffering through education.”
     
  2. Advisor

    Advisor Mi Staff Sergeant MI.Net Member

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    People should be treated so well.
     
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