Photos Military Art

"USS Missouri (BB-63) under attack by Iraqi Silkworm". Painting, oil on canvas board by John Charles Roach, 1991.
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While providing gunfire support to harass the Iraqi troops in Kuwait in preparation for a possible amphibious landing, USS Missouri (BB-63) was fired upon by an Iraqi silkworm anti-ship missile. By the use of infrared flares and chaff, the missile's guidance was confused. It crossed close astern of Missouri and was engaged and shot down by HMS Gloucester (D-96).
 
"Battle of Lake Erie" By Patrick Lyons O’Brien
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The Battle of Lake Erie, sometimes called the Battle of Put-in-Bay, was fought on 10 September 1813, on Lake Erie off the coast of Ohio during the War of 1812. Nine vessels of the United States Navy defeated and captured six vessels of the British Royal Navy. This ensured American control of the lake for the rest of the war, which in turn allowed the Americans to recover Detroit and win the Battle of the Thames to break the Indian confederation of Tecumseh. It was one of the biggest naval battles of the War of 1812.
 
"Night action off Cape Matapan, Greece, 28 March 1941" by Norman Wilkinson
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T
he British battleships, under guidance of radar, moved into position under the cover of night. When they revealed themselves to the Italian cruisers, they were a mere four kilometers away--pretty much point-blank range as far as battleships are concerned. They were so close, even the carrier HMS Formidable allegedly took a few parting shots at the Italian ships with her secondary batteries, which would make her the only fleet carrier to participate in a battle line.
 
Two Supermarine Spitfire from Polish 303 Squadron RAF
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No. 303 Squadron RAF was formed in July 1940 in Blackpool, England before deployment to RAF Northolt on 2 August as part of an agreement between the Polish Government in Exile and the United Kingdom. It had a distinguished combat record and was disbanded in December 1946.
 
I am back Gents
Washington Crossing the Delaware is an 1851 oil-on-canvas painting by the German-American arti...jpg
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It commemorates General George Washington during his famous crossing of the Delaware River with the Continental Army on the night of December 25–26, 1776, during the American Revolutionary War. That action was the first move in a surprise attack against the German Hessian allied mercenary forces at Trenton, New Jersey, in the Battle of Trenton on the morning of December 26.

The original was part of the collection at the Kunsthalle in Bremen, Germany, and was destroyed in a bombing raid in 1942, during World War II. Leutze painted two more versions, one of which is now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. The other was in the West Wing reception area of the White House in Washington, D.C., but in March 2015, was put on display at The Minnesota Marine Art Museum in Winona, Minnesota.
 
I am back GentsView attachment 272191[
It commemorates General George Washington during his famous crossing of the Delaware River with the Continental Army on the night of December 25–26, 1776, during the American Revolutionary War. That action was the first move in a surprise attack against the German Hessian allied mercenary forces at Trenton, New Jersey, in the Battle of Trenton on the morning of December 26.

The original was part of the collection at the Kunsthalle in Bremen, Germany, and was destroyed in a bombing raid in 1942, during World War II. Leutze painted two more versions, one of which is now in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. The other was in the West Wing reception area of the White House in Washington, D.C., but in March 2015, was put on display at The Minnesota Marine Art Museum in Winona, Minnesota.
A skirmish between Prussian infantry and Cossacks in the battle of Zorndorf 1758 , 1862-Emil H...jpg
 
F*** it. Better ask forgiveness than permission.

Clutching the colors of the 46th Infantry Regiment, Frederick rallies his men in a last-ditch stand on the Prussian left. Seydlitz’s cavalry would save the day.
 

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F*** it. Better ask forgiveness than permission.

Clutching the colors of the 46th Infantry Regiment, Frederick rallies his men in a last-ditch stand on the Prussian left. Seydlitz’s cavalry would save the day.

The Battle of Hohenfriedeberg on June 4, 1745. Prussian Grenadier battalions beat the Saxon Guard. Carl Röchling.
The Battle of Hohenfriedeberg on June 4, 1745. Prussian Grenadier battalions beat the Saxon Gu...jpg
 
Apotheosis depicts a pile of human skulls set on the barren earth, the aftermath of a battle or siege. A flock of carrion birds are seen to be occupied with picking over the pile; some birds have already landed, while others are flying in or roosting in nearby trees. The ground below them is a sallow, earthy yellow covered with grass, complimenting the dirty ivory color of the partially-bleached skulls. The shadow cast by the mound, coupled with the many black orifices created by empty jaws and eye-sockets, adds a sense of depth to the painting, further exacerbating the scale of the deathly pile. A range of mountains serves as a dividing line for the painting, separating the vastness of the steppes from the emptiness of the sky, while the city of Samarkand can be seen in the far right of the painting. The city's walls have visibly been breached, a reference to the Siege of Samarkand in the summer of 1868 in which the Russian garrison repulsed a Bukharid attack.[1][3] The pyramid-like pile of skulls is in reference to the Mongol conquests, as the Mongols were recorded as have built pyramids out of the skulls of their enemies.[4] This was documented as having happened at Urgench, Kiev, Baghdad, and at Samarkand itself in 1220.[5][4] On the work's frame, Vereshchagin inscribed that he dedicated the painting "to all great conquerors, past, present and to come
 

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This painting comes from Osprey Publishing’s Campaign 186: Operation Barbarossa, 1941 (3) Army Group Center.

Here is the description from the book, which points out specific details from the image:

”In August and September, Hitler had opted for firming up Barbarossa’s flanks while destroying huge numbers of Red Army forces; Moscow had to wait. In October, Operation Typhoon began with great promise, but then bogged down in the autumn rains and mud - the rasputitsa. The freezing weather of November added new miseries for soldiers of both sides, but at least it allowed continued German forward movement.

Barbarossa’s last lunge would have to fight its way through hand-dug fortifications, Stavka’s last thrown-together reserves, and units newly arriving from the Soviet Far East. Despite heavy casualties and sheer exhaustion, neither side showed any sign of letting up. After marching nearly a thousand kilometers, the long-suffering German infantry would find the last hundred to Moscow among the hardest. Hitler, Haider and most of the Reich leadership expected glorious victory to await them in Stalin’s capital; and while the Landser fought for each new village mostly in hope of finding shelter from the next freezing night, the thought of Moscow did exert a powerful attraction. At the far end of a long and poorly-executed logistic tail, they did find some ammunition trickling forward, but in terms of food, fodder and clothing it was often a case of every man for himself.

Defending their capital also motivated the Red Army. The massive Kessel battles of summer and autumn had swallowed up two whole waves of armies; the third and last - a combination of militiamen, barely-trained levies and untried troops from the Far East - would fight behind three main lines of defenses, mostly built by Moscow’s civilians under the harsh supervision of the Communist Party and NKVD. Soviet logistic problems eased as the front lines approached Moscow, with reinforcements and equipment going directly from the arriving trains to the front lines in a few hours.

This scene shows infantry and engineers of the 137th Infantry Division negotiating the defenses near Voronino almost due south of Moscow, between Maloyaroslavets and Serphukov. The infantry first fought their way across a steep-sided antitank ditch and then through the primitive earthen field works beyond, losing many men to mines and machine-gun fire. The Soviets quickly launched counterattacks, often supported by tanks. Early on November 17, Soviet tanks overran two howitzers; the divisional commander, General Bergmann, asked for reinforcements, in this case 8.8cm Flak 36 guns of Corps Flak Abteilung 707, pulled by their SdKfz prime movers over a tactical bridge erected by the engineers. Overhead, Nebelwerfer rockets pound the Soviet lines.”
 

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Charles de Steuben's Bataille de Poitiers en octobre 732 romantically depicts a triumphant Cha...jpg


Charles de Steuben's Bataille de Poitiers en octobre 732 romantically depicts a triumphant Charles Martel (mounted) facing Abdul Rahman Al Ghafiqi (right) at the Battle of Tours.
 
WO2 Mark Williams’ by Stuart Brown COMMENT.jpg


“Known affectionately by his many friends as Mark he was a small man with huge depths of physical courage and stamina, and a giant personality. Beneath his kindness and sense of fun and adventure was the most professional soldier, who was loved and respected by the whole Battalion, not least those under his command.

WO2 Michael Williams was killed during a firefight. He was on a deliberate operation against the Taliban in the Upper Sangin Valley when he was fatally wounded.

‘A thoughtful man, when he spoke his words never failed to have impact and his actions always said more than words ever could. He expected high standards, setting only the best example in his own conduct. In leadership terms he was the anchor point for his Fire Support Group, pulling them together as a tight knit team, motivated to excel through a desire not to let him down. As far as his trade was concerned, what he did not know about machine gunnery was not worth knowing, he was a true professional and took great pride in his vocation.

‘Compact in stature but strong in heart, his character overflowed, brought joy to many and left one feeling at ease in his presence. He was genuine, uncomplicated, straight talking and honest, a better man could not be found. He died providing overwatch and security for Bruneval Company as it undertook its most challenging operation to date in the centre of the Taliban’s heartland beyond Sangin. Whilst we will miss him greatly, we will all be thankful and consider ourselves blessed to have known him.’

Company Commander, Major Adam Dawson”
 
High Water Mark of the Wehrmacht”-German units penetrate to within 19 kilometers of the Kremlin during the Battle of Moscow, December 2, 1941. Painting by Howard Gerrard
 

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The fall of Babylon; Cyrus the Great defeating the Chaldean army. Mezzotint by John Martin, 1831, after himself, 1819
 

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