Warfare HAMAS attack on Israel, October 2023

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Hamas will keep on existing, even if with its leaders gone. They are more symbolic than anything and are "remote piloting" things from afar.
It will survive, just like mold. Perhaps it will rebrand itself, or get phagocyted by another group. That's how terror groups work.

Hezbollah might very well keep on doing what it does if Iran keeps on backing them. And if Hamas is gone, I don't see why Iran would bail on Hezbollah.
Mostly agree. Iran definitely will continue supporting Hezbollah, but Hezbollah has everything it wants now, as it is in de facto control of Lebanon. At some point, they may tire of the Iranian mullahs telling them that they must die for them.
 
Mostly agree. Iran definitely will continue supporting Hezbollah, but Hezbollah has everything it wants now, as it is in de facto control of Lebanon. At some point, they may tire of the Iranian mullahs telling them that they must die for them.
Given Lebanon is a basket case, I'd say the locals have done well from the deal, but they could take a different view, when asked to suicide themselves en masse, for Iran.
 
Mostly agree. Iran definitely will continue supporting Hezbollah, but Hezbollah has everything it wants now, as it is in de facto control of Lebanon. At some point, they may tire of the Iranian mullahs telling them that they must die for them.

But with Hamas gone, who or what will fill that vacuum?

All the people who follow Hamas aren't necessarily militants willing to fight, some are just supporters. The ones who are in Palestine will have to turn to someone once/if Hamas is gone. Unless a new entity appears from its ashes, Hezbollah is likely to harvest these people. And these people will be motivated, full of resent, anger and frustration. Very useful tools to solidify and re-energize your base.

Pro-Hamas abroad will probably continue to support Hamas, or whatever is left of it; or will simply go on simping for whoever replaces it.

See Yasser Araft and Fatah; they used to be the emblems of the "Palestinian resistance". Arafat was a symbolic figure akin to the Che or Castro. Now they are gone and forgotten.
 
Hello everyone,

Does anyone know how much an Iranian ballistic missile costs ? Like the Qiam or the Sejil ?

I found the cost of the Shahed drones and Iranian cruise missiles, around 50K$ and 1 or 2M$ respectivly, wich seems realistic. But some media, including serious ones, are telling that 2000 Km range Iranian ballistic missile, such as the ones used to strike Israel few days ago, costs around 100K$, which is the cost of a "modern" anti tank missile or a Hellfire missile. Of course I have serious doubts about this stated estimated cost.

Do you have any serious knowledge or opinion on the topic ?

Thank you in advance !
 
Hello everyone,

Does anyone know how much an Iranian ballistic missile costs ? Like the Qiam or the Sejil ?

I found the cost of the Shahed drones and Iranian cruise missiles, around 50K$ and 1 or 2M$ respectivly, wich seems realistic. But some media, including serious ones, are telling that 2000 Km range Iranian ballistic missile, such as the ones used to strike Israel few days ago, costs around 100K$, which is the cost of a "modern" anti tank missile or a Hellfire missile. Of course I have serious doubts about this stated estimated cost.

Do you have any serious knowledge or opinion on the topic ?

Thank you in advance !
1) Labor costs are way lower than they are in the west and manufacturers might be getting direct funding from the government or at the very least things like tax exemptions;
2) Cheaper might mean they aren't nearly as good. The succes of western missiles, both air defence and cruise missiles in Ukraine might indicate inferiority of russian and Iranian air defences and offensive missiles. They developed air defence systems of their own, but their most sensitive sites are still protected by systems bought from russia which to me is an indicator of their quality considering the mediocre results of S-300 and S-400 in Ukraine in dealing with missile threats. They clearly don't trust them enough themselves to replace foreign systems.

It's not easy to get accurate numbers, but the number of projectiles which chrashed due to technical failures seems to have been substantial for the missiles;
3) Russian weapons systems are "cheap" because the manufacturers are forced to bid low on government contracts and they try to make up the loss by overcharging on export contracts. It's quite like that Iran does the same, certainly seems to be the case with deliveries to russia because they know russia is in no position to turn down Iranian weapons no matter what the cost.

So the listed cost is the monetary value that the government bought them for. It doesn’t specify what it cost to manufacture them and whether or not that is economically viable in the long run without either huge amounts of taxpayer money or having the manufacturer go under/lose production capacity/poorer quality control/fall behind in the tech race due to less technical innovation etc.

Russia has been trying to find an export partner who will fund the development of Su-57 for years now because they can't or won't pay for it themselves.

Between russia, China and Iran you can clearly see that their missiles share the same design heritage. China is the unknown factor and maybe they've worked out all of the flaws, we can't afford to presume that they haven't, but russia and Iran clearly haven't so far.
 
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But with Hamas gone, who or what will fill that vacuum?

All the people who follow Hamas aren't necessarily militants willing to fight, some are just supporters. The ones who are in Palestine will have to turn to someone once/if Hamas is gone. Unless a new entity appears from its ashes, Hezbollah is likely to harvest these people. And these people will be motivated, full of resent, anger and frustration. Very useful tools to solidify and re-energize your base.

Pro-Hamas abroad will probably continue to support Hamas, or whatever is left of it; or will simply go on simping for whoever replaces it.

See Yasser Araft and Fatah; they used to be the emblems of the "Palestinian resistance". Arafat was a symbolic figure akin to the Che or Castro. Now they are gone and forgotten.
Definitely, there will be a Hamas replacement. There is just too much hate in the Palestinian culture not to. But Gaza will never be self governing again. Perhaps Hezbollah will smarten up and decide they don't want to die for Iran. But maybe not.
 
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and half off
The Taliban do let girls go to school,” boasted the teenage boy. “But they stop them when they turn 11, which is very fair.”
In an after-school detention, a handful of pupils were doing their best to convince me, their teacher, that Afghanistan was much nicer now the Taliban were in control. Nothing I said would convince them. It turned out these children not only supported gender inequality but were fans of executing all manner of criminals too.
My pupils are a lively bunch. The school, where I teach humanities, is a large academy in the south of England and caters to those from poor families. Most are Muslim and a few have lived in Islamic countries, including Saudi Arabia and Afghanistan. They burst with character and enthusiasm for improving their lives. I work hard to help them and have a genuine pride in them, in a way only fellow teachers will understand.

But I also worry about them. I share some of the same concerns that Katharine Birbalsingh expressed after her legal victory last week, when she successfully defended a High Court challenge to her ban on prayer rituals. In the absence of a clear commitment to British values, she argued, identity politics was filling the vacuum.
The more I get to know my pupils, the more distressed I am by some of their views. Of course, teenagers have always aspired to radical chic in order to shock their elders. In my youth, we lounged around the school common room repeating Frankie Boyle’s most offensive jokes.
But this generation is different. The other day, in response to a comment made by a pupil, I asked a class of 13-year-olds to raise their hands if they hated Britain. Thirty hands shot up with immediate, absolute certainty.
I’m not sure how many of my pupils support the Taliban. It is probably a minority, but not a small one. Many of the boys I teach hold shocking views on women. One Year 8 pupil regularly interrupts lessons with diatribes about how western society is brainwashing young men into becoming more feminine. Most of the lads I teach think women should have fewer rights than men. They spend citizenship lessons arguing that wives should not work.
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Pupils who support the Taliban may have been manipulated online
EBRAHIM NOROOZI/AP
Such views come from a dangerous manipulation of their faith they find online. The misogynist influencer Andrew Tate is their hero, particularly since his claimed conversion to Islam.
In some ways, the fact that these children hate Britain and all its values is not entirely surprising. Many have relatives whose lives were ruined by the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. They fled to Britain for a better life, having fought against oppressive regimes. It is strange, then, that a Kurdish boy of Iraqi descent should tell me he admires Saddam Hussein. “Iraq’s just a bit rubbish now,” he reasons. A blame he can easily place with Britain.
My pupil’s childhoods were spent watching parents processing trauma from these wars, while around them British government policies seemed focused on disparaging immigrants: the “hostile environment”, Brexit and now the Rwanda plan. A Muslim teacher tells me she has been called a terrorist in the street. The children, she says, will have faced similar harassment.
But all too often these sentiments spill into bigotry towards their own country and others who live here. Due to the Gaza war, no group is more despised than the Jews, with pupils regularly making comments of pure hatred. Teachers are asked: “Who do you support: Israel or Palestine?” We are supposed to remain neutral, but some staff adorn their laptops with pro-Palestinian slogans.
And this reflects a big part of the problem: my school and many others are rolling over and not even attempting to mount a defence of western values.
My colleagues tend to believe that the solution to our pupils’ dislike of Britain is to design a curriculum that is packed with hand-wringing about western imperialism and institutional racism. If we teach them we did wrong, then they will know that we are sorry and move on, the argument goes.
This process of radical healing can be useful. It can help to have difficult conversations and entice pupils from different backgrounds into engaging critically with their work. But I also think it has gone too far.
In some schools, the anti-western narrative is woven through much of the curriculum. A friend of mine teaches history and in a single day says he could teach the Spanish colonisation of the Americas, the Portuguese colonisation of Africa, the British colonisation of India, the decolonisation of the British Empire and the slave trade. This relentless focus on empire does not seem to have made our pupils any less angry.
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Katharaine Birbalsingh has led the push-back against perceived identity politics in the curriculum
STEWART WILLIAMS
The problem is not limited to my pupils. I once taught at a middle-class school with mostly white children. Here, the curriculum was similarly designed to open minds to the evils of western civilisation. The pupils were not susceptible to Islamism, but were still imbued with a sense that their country is particularly bad. Increasingly, schools are not dissuading children of these prejudices, but confirming them.
My school is only part of the problem. The history curriculum at many schools may now feature the diversity of troops in the First World War, or the 1980s as a period of queer exploration. These are worthwhile subjects for an undergraduate essay, but not substitutes for the basic building blocks of historical knowledge.
I once observed a Year 8 lesson on the “black Tudors”. One pupil raised his hand to ask: “Who were the Tudors?” — they hadn’t thought to teach the Reformation before the racism. Similarly, when teaching the Norman Conquest, it is becoming unfashionable to teach the pivotal Battle of Hastings. Instead, some schools focus on studying Empress Matilda, who ruled Brit. Again, a worthy subject at some point, but an odd one to teach to Year 7s instead of the fact Harold Godwinson was (probably) shot in the eye with an arrow.
I worry the effect of this pedagogical radicalism is not to calm tensions, but to exacerbate them. A teacher friend visited a school recently and heard its head of history describe the aim of their curriculum as the creation of “scholar activists”. They said they wanted to turn pupils into radical agents of protest against a state they say is institutionally racist.
Some of this chaos is down to the growth of academy schools that began under Michael Gove when he was education secretary. Gove attempted to introduce a conservative version of the national curriculum. But now academies and free schools, which now comprise 80 per cent of secondary schools, have greater freedoms to dictate their curriculums. The result for some schools has been much less 1066 and much more “all that” .
Solving this problem is tricky. It is sad there seems to be little desire to measure and discuss the scale of disaffection I see from my pupils.
Curriculums, to the extent pupils pay attention to them, can be a powerful tool to mould society. Yet hardly anyone is arguing for a balanced, liberal curriculum that would focus on traditional subjects while incorporating critical, or decolonised, narratives. From what I have seen, the alternative to this produces some pretty troubling results.

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/topic/schools

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March 18 2024, 5.00pm GMT
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Labour pledge to fight ‘growing scourge’ of classroom misogyny
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, Senior Political Correspondent


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I’m curious about why the university’s staff allows the university’s prestige to be lowered.
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These Large Air Defense Vehicles of Russia are the future woolly mammoths. I have always enjoyed looking at them and the construction used. They are designed for rugged terrain and play the part very well. They invest very little in airfields knowing it will be the first target in a large scale war. All the aircraft have been built with large rugged terrain undercarriages so landing on soil is possible for most. During Iraq I war all the west had for any all purpose landing was the Jaguar. India still has them in service.... Just look at the ground clearance on these Jaguars
 

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I’m curious about why the university’s staff allows the university’s prestige to be lowered.
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Foreign money in the hundreds of millions to do the bidding of foreign countries. No army needed to destroy us from within, so far it is working fine for them. Just look as these Soro s funded prosecutors who now have taken over the 2024 election with simple charges that are going to be thrown out as soon as they reach the supreme court. By that time they will have won simply keeping Trump from winning.
 
clinton was on national tv with his r.s with monica L . doesnt mean anything in the land of the free :)
What? What on earth are you on about? What has this got to do with the subject at hand?
Please don't. If there's one thing I don't wanna see, it's Trump getting his arse rimmed by a Russian prostitute.
 
I’m curious about why the university’s staff allows the university’s prestige to be lowered.
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Sadly the degradation of University's in the USA has been on going for decades, root of many of the problems in the country today.
 
What? What on earth are you on about? What has this got to do with the subject at hand?
Please don't. If there's one thing I don't wanna see, it's Trump getting his arse rimmed by a Russian prostitute.
Rhetorical. There are no pics. That whole "pee tape" thingy was completely fabricated and has been totally debunked - but some people still fantasize that it's true.
 
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