Photos California Wildfires

berkut76

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Due to massive lightning storms (I have never witnessed anything like this in my life like something from Sci-Fi movie) there are massive wildfires burning in NorCal. Here are some photos:

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We lost two in the first week but after that people have learned not to drive where they shouldn't and to evacuate without delay when they should.

These are rural areas most of people are not trying to save their belongings, but cattle, horses, and household pets.
 
Coronavirus, wildfires combine to create a Bay Area respiratory catastrophe

This is the disaster scenario the Bay Area has been dreading since March. Wildfires, awful air quality and the coronavirus pandemic are combining to strain public health resources stretched impossibly thin.

The potential for respiratory catastrophe looms large on two fronts. Fires are ringing the nine counties and thick smoke blankets the region. The coronavirus still is circulating widely, with more than 1,000 new cases reported most days. The added air pollution could make matters worse, experts said.

Meanwhile fire-related evacuations in nearly every Bay Area county are creating additional public health difficulties, from how to keep people socially distant in shelters to finding hotel rooms and other safe spaces to house those who need them.

And there are other challenges. Firefighters may face increased risk of contracting the coronavirus while living and working in close quarters on the front lines. In hospitals and evacuation shelters across the region, people suffering smoke exposure may have symptoms that could be confused for COVID-19, complicating care and draining resources.

“These are all cascading catastrophes. We’re looking at the consequences of these overlapping emergencies,” said Dr. Matt Willis, the Marin County health officer. “We had been concerned there might be a fire here or there. And now we’re dealing with fires everywhere. And while we’re still seeing all this viral transmission.”

And on top of it all, everyone’s exhausted.

“We’re at that point of time where you’re just numb dealing with crises,” said Dr. Bela Matyas, the health officer in Solano County, where thousands have been evacuated this week due to several large, threatening fires. “But it’s an emergency. You don’t really think, you just do. And people are stepping up.”

For many health experts, the most pressing issue is whether the poor air quality from wildfire smoke will exacerbate symptoms of COVID-19, or lead to more coronavirus infections, potentially driving up transmission and sending more people to hospitals even as the Bay Area struggles to quash a summer surge in cases.
 
The Axis-BonnyDoon wildfire camera in the Santa Cruz Mountains stopped transmitting at 11:22 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2020. This was its last image.

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These are rural areas most of people are not trying to save their belongings, but cattle, horses, and household pets.

We live in a rural area too, it is heavily wooded and quiet hilly much like on the photos you've posted. We had seven years of drought and it was over 40C for nearly week and very strong winds and because of stupid greenies winter backburn wasn't done for few years.
 
Firefighter Victimized By Looters As Wildfires Ravage California

A firefighter’s marked car was burglarized by looters who decided to take advantage of the wildfires devastating California, officials revealed Sunday.

The unidentified firefighter’s wallet was stolen and his bank account drained while he directed firefighting crews in Santa Cruz County, Battalion Chief Mark Brunton of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection told reporters Sunday.

Santa Cruz County Sheriff Jim Hart said looters were breaking into empty houses after residents evacuated from the area near the CZU Lightning Complex wildfire, which burned 74,000 acres by Sunday night and killed one person. It was only 8% contained.

Hart’s officers have already arrested eight suspected looters for allegedly stealing various personal possessions, including guns and an outdoor heating system. He vowed to pull over anyone who doesn’t belong in the communities and arrest them.

I have no empathy, I have no patience for somebody who is going to come into our community and steal from people who have been who have been evacuated and victimized and traumatized,” Hart said at a press conference.

As for the victimized firefighter, Hart said he’s confident they’ll find the thief.

“We’re going to hand that case over to the [district attorney] and the DA is going to hammer this guy,” Hart said.
 
They collected classic Chevys, Ginny dolls. The LNU fires incinerated it all

The 72-year-old retired land surveyor had lived on the five-acre property for 30 years with his 70-year-old wife Marci. They were both lifelong collectors. His wife lost her 500 Ginny dolls, stamp collection, antiques, and Albers lost his 500-piece train set, 200 plastic car models. And all the classic restored Chevys melted and roasted — including eight Corvettes and some 1930’s-era vehicles.

t’s pretty devastating,” Ken Albers said. “There’s nothing left of the house but the chimney.”

Living in Northern California, the Albers had seen the glow of wildfires in the distance in prior years. It happened again on Tuesday night, as they got ready for bed. Out the window, there was an orange glow in the hills over Lake Berryessa.

By Wednesday at 2 a.m. everything changed — fast. He got a call from PG&E warning him of a power shut off. He looked out his window again, this time flames were coming up the hill.

Soon, there was a firefighter over a loudspeaker ordering evacuations in the small subdivision of homes on 5- to 10-acre lots at the end of English Hills Road.

“He told us there’s no fire suppression, you gotta get out,” Ken Albers said.

As they packed their two dogs Zooey and Reggie into their two cars, they got a call from Solano County announcing the evacuations.

“We left with the clothes on our back,” he said. “Fire was everywhere ... I was dodging downed poles and burning poles.”

Now, everything they poured into their hobbies — their cherished collections — is gone.

There was a 1936 Chevy standard coach, restored to stock. There was a 1938 two-door Chevy sedan. A 1954 Chevy Bel Air convertible. The eight Corvettes — ranging from 1957 to 2016. And the 1970 Chevy Camaro his wife bought brand new.

“I guess it always crossed your mind,” Ken Albers said Monday from a hotel in Vacaville where he and his wife are staying for now. “The last 4 or 5 years there’s always been a fire that came in our general direction, and so, we were always aware but it had never gotten this close.”

They don’t know if they will rebuild.

“As far as collecting, it’s taken all the winds out of our sails,” Ken Albers said.

The couple has been staying in a hotel room and returning back to their former home to pick through the rubble as they wrap their head around what to do next. It was too soon, he said, to say if they'll return back to Vacaville.

“We’re just trying to find a place to live,” he said.
 
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Firefighters save 1,400-year-old redwood at Armstrong park


Firefighters and state natural resources crews on Tuesday guided the Walbridge fire that has been blazing through wooded hillsides in Sonoma County largely around the towering redwoods in Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve.

Some trees sustained damage in their cavities, but the Colonel Armstrong tree — the oldest tree in the grove estimated to be 1,400 years old — was not damaged by the blaze. The historic Colonel Armstrong tree was “happy” on Tuesday, said Brendan O’Neil, a natural resources manager for California State Parks Sonoma-Mendocino Coast District who oversees the reserve.

The blaze largely burned the forest floor, which allows for nutrient cycling and allows redwood seedlings to germinate, O’Neil said. The fire activity will also be a benefit for the park because it “reduces the potential for future catastrophic wildfires,” O’Neil said.

“We’ve been working cooperatively (with Cal Fire) too, as carefully as possible, to help guide the fire through the forest to minimize damage to the irreplaceable resources that we have there,” O’Neil told The Chronicle on Tuesday night.
 
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Hours and hours of sweat and blood’: Firefighters beat back flames, with weather finally cooperating

Firefighters, aided by calming weather and additional crews on the front lines, made significant progress Tuesday on three major Bay Area infernos that were sparked by lightning last week.

Some residents of Napa and Sonoma counties were allowed to return home following two days of favorable conditions that allowed firefighters to increase containment of the massive LNU Lightning Complex fires to 27%.

The LNU has burned 356,326 acres and is among a swarm of storm-triggered blazes that have charred more than 1.25 million acres statewide since Aug. 15, according to Daniel Berlant, a Cal Fire assistant deputy director.


But as the flames die down, the uncertainty will linger. Weather forecasts portend more intense heat this weekend, baking portions of the Central Valley. Thunder storms projected to hit areas north of Lake Tahoe Tuesday and Wednesday could bring more lightning and the threat of additional wildfires.

And fire season still has three months to go.
 
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Hours and hours of sweat and blood’: Firefighters beat back flames, with weather finally cooperating

Firefighters, aided by calming weather and additional crews on the front lines, made significant progress Tuesday on three major Bay Area infernos that were sparked by lightning last week.

Some residents of Napa and Sonoma counties were allowed to return home following two days of favorable conditions that allowed firefighters to increase containment of the massive LNU Lightning Complex fires to 27%.

The LNU has burned 356,326 acres and is among a swarm of storm-triggered blazes that have charred more than 1.25 million acres statewide since Aug. 15, according to Daniel Berlant, a Cal Fire assistant deputy director.


But as the flames die down, the uncertainty will linger. Weather forecasts portend more intense heat this weekend, baking portions of the Central Valley. Thunder storms projected to hit areas north of Lake Tahoe Tuesday and Wednesday could bring more lightning and the threat of additional wildfires.

And fire season still has three months to go.
alone kitty ?? but lucky kitty ? ♥
 

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