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Article Battle Of Nalapani

Discussion in 'Other combat operations' started by ENGINEER, May 29, 2017.


  1. ENGINEER United Kingdom

    ENGINEER Mi Sergeant MI.Net Member

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    The battle has many accounts and no link is preferable and all are based on the original publication.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Nalapani
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rollo_Gillespie
    https://www.warhistoryonline.com/fe...ires-sunset-the-battle-of-kalunga-1814.html/2
    http://mrtpix.tripod.com/regmi11.htm Very Revealing information.
    Khalanga War Memorial / Dehradun
    Located at just 5 kms from Dehradun city center at Sahastradhara Road, Khalanga War Memorial is a famous tourist spot in Dehradun which still depicts the brave story of Gorkhas. Its becomes big honour when an enemy erects a memorial of their opponent. It is perhaps world's first memorial erected by an army for their opponent. It was Britishers who constructed Khalanga War Memorial in the memory of their General "Gilaspy" and other army men as well as Gorkha General "Balbhadra Thapa" to pay tribute to their courage jointly after the battle of Nalapani which was faught in 1814.
    The Bravery of Gorkha's
    In the month of October 1814, Major General Sir Rollo Gillespie of the British army had advanced along with 3,500 troops and eleven pieces of cannon to occupy the Nepali territories situated between the Ganges and Yamuna rivers in the Gharwal and Kumaon regions that had been occupied by the Nepali forces. Captain Balabhadra Kunwar had maintained his position at a 400 cubits high hill in a place called Nalapani, situated north-east of Dehradun, to check his advance. On Kartik 8, 1871, Bikram Samvat (October 1814), British troops reached Dehradun. A battle took place between British and Nepali troops at Nalapani on Kartik 10, 1871 B. Samvat. The British were unsuccessful and withdrew to Dehradun. Another battle was fought between the two sides at Nalapani on Kartik 17, 1871 Samvat (ca. Oct 31, 1814). General Gillespie, the British Commander, lost his life in that battle along with Col. Alice. The siege continued for a month until the British, convinced that they could not win by military ways, blocked the source of water to the fort so that the Nepalese would die of thirst. For the Nepali Army it was a hard struggle fighting a very well equipped and trained modern army, belonging to one of the largest colonial Empires of the world. Balbhadra Kunwar had asked for reinforcements from the capital but Kathmandu could not send them any soldiers as the Nepali army had no reserve army and were an emerging power which means that they did not have troops to match the East India Company. The Nepalese army was outnumbered in Nalapani as it was in every battlefield.

    Even though the Nepali army lacked water they were still determined to defend their position. Because the walls had collapsed, cannonballs fired by the British started reaching the interior of the fort. Many men were killed or injured. Despite losing their comrades and friends the remaining men were still determined to defend their position. In order to drink water from the river they came out of the fort in a single line, and the British forces watched in surprise as the Nepali troops quenched their thirst and returned to their fort. On Marga 16 (Nov 1814), four of the commanders, including Capt. Balabhadra Kunwar, in the night was forced to abandoned the fort of Nalapani with their remaining Gorkhali troops. On seeing the Nepalis abandon the fort, the British attacked them. The Nepalis resisted the attack but continued to advance. They reached Dwara in the morning of Marga 17, 1871 and stayed the whole day there.

    After 4 days of thirst, and a severe loss of troops, without surrendering, Capt. Balbhadra emerged from the fort with drawn kukris in his hands (along with other 70 survivors) and roared to the British - "You could have never won the battle but now I myself voluntarily abandon this fort. There is nothing inside the fort other than dead corpses of the children and women"! He and his remaining troops escaped into the hills on November 30, 1814. A peace treaty was signed on Dec 2, 1815 between the then King Girvan Yuddha Vikram Shah and the British East India Company, known as the Sugauli Treaty. The British soldier-poet, John Ship, had written during the war about the Gorkhas:

    "I never saw more steadiness Or bravery exhibited in my life. Run they would not and of death They seemed to have no fear though their comrades were falling Thick around them, as bold For we were so near to know That every shot of ours told."

    Khalanga War Memorial - A Salute to Gorkhas by Britishers
    Famous Gorkha War or Anglo-Nepalese or Anglo-Gorkha War was fought between Britishers and Gorkhas of Nepal. In Battel of Nalapani, 600 Gorkhas fought bravely against 3000 odd soldiers in Khalanga Fort near Nalapani, Dehradun. For six weeks, Gorkhas were protecting the fort without food and water. Impressed by the unmatched bravery, Britishers erected the Khalanga (Kalinga) War Memorial to honor Gorkhas. After that Britishers recruits Gorkhas in their army too. This memorial is under conservation of ASI.
    kalinga-war-memorial-252703.jpg kalinga-war-memorial-3414873.jpg kalinga-war-memorial-2144796.jpg
    Above are the modern views of the battle memorial.
    Here is a well known picture of Major General Sir Robert Rollo Gillespie KCB.
    Rollo_Gillespie.jpg

    Here is the link to William Thorns' book that you can download and all books and accounts use this reference as the basis.
    A Memoir of Sir Robert Rollo Gillespie
    The book plate portrait is taken from our family records but sadly my father lost his parents when a V1 bomb hit 51 The Common, Woolwich and the miniatures were lost. Dad features in the other posts about Neinberg Bridge.
    upload_2017-5-29_23-53-34.png

    I can however give you more and better, of course, and in our family archive are some glass plates of the originals. They date from around 1876. There is nothing like these anywhere and they will go to the Ghurka Museum in due course
    13015379_10153655982868691_1510007411691698527_n.jpg
    Archive scan of a photo of around 1876. Original on glass plate. As an Ensign.
    13064760_10153655977648691_3748692936004350191_o.jpg
    Archive scan of a photo of around 1876. Original on glass plate. The older General of course.
    The minature differs from the usually seen engraving and is therefore more accurate being made from life.
    13040837_10153656090863691_4893227805579749480_o.jpg
    You won't see an earlier photo of this. It is unique. Memorial at Dehradun, Taken 1876
    nscription is damaged.
    "To the Memory of Maj GeneraLSir R.R.Gillespie K,C.B. Non Commissioned officiers and men who fell at the two assaults on the (Ripped off*) Oct 31 st and Nov 27th. 1814
    *Kulunga ".
    13043660_10153656089428691_3520144510943006107_n.jpg
    This will also be the earliest photo available of the memorial in Meerut in the botanical gardens. 1876.
     
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  2. Bombardier

    Bombardier Admin & Arbiter Staff Member Site Admin

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    Excellent article mate that was a good read Mil-smile01
     
  3. ENGINEER United Kingdom

    ENGINEER Mi Sergeant MI.Net Member

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    One of my favourtite blogs is this one. The author is an Indian policeman and he has a talent for writing. It is worth reading all his blog pages ,
    http://www.hillsofmorni.com/history...ory-rajahs-encounter-with-col-gillespie-1807/
    Jyoti Thapa's great grandfather bought the site of the battle to preserve it. That in itself caused a takeover bid for ownership. She founded the Archaelogical Service of India mentioned above. Here is a reference to her book, http://nepalitimes.com/article/review/The-Khukri-Braves-review,2945
     
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  4. ENGINEER United Kingdom

    ENGINEER Mi Sergeant MI.Net Member

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    PHOTO. Silver on glass negative c 1876 on glass with cover envelope as seen on the other photo series GENERAL001.jpg
    Gillespie as a Captain

    GENERAL002.jpg
    Cover of glass negative

    The slide scan has been reversed and also digitally enhanced for clarity. There is no other version of this photo or portrait to be seen anywhere even on Internet and this photo is absolutely unique.
     
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  5. ENGINEER United Kingdom

    ENGINEER Mi Sergeant MI.Net Member

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    In the art world various slices of misinformation arise. I guess it affects the price and in this case. Estimate: 5,000 - 8,000 EUR Lot 1071
    https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/sheppards-auction-house
    This so so wildly wrong from any angle it is unbelievable.
    general 4.jpg
    It looks nothing like the General whose face is slim and leaner and the uniform seems to be wrong. Saying it is a portrait of him is to say the least imaginative.

    Next comes a pair of miniatures and again they have very little resemblance. Our precise family records have no trace of these ever existing.
    http://www.artnet.com/artists/james-scouler/sir-robert

    general 3.Jpeg

    It is sheer speculation.
    I don't know who dreams up this rubbish.
     
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  6. ENGINEER United Kingdom

    ENGINEER Mi Sergeant MI.Net Member

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    I had an email today from Gavin Edgerly-Harris, Director of the Gurkha Museum accepting these items-
    "Dear Rollo (if I may)
    Thank you for your e-mail and have looked at militaryimages.net.
    We would be delighted if you were to gift these items to the Museum. Ther(s)e are an important link with the very first days of the Gurkha/British relationship.
    Please let me know what you would wish to do? I am away on holiday from Friday until 5th Sept so perhaps we could arrange something after that.
    Regards
    Gavin"
    I am truly honoured and even emotionally moved to know this material is safe.
    Does any one know the name of the lady who is the Russian digital colourisation mistress? I am sure she features here on this site.
     

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